CATEGORIES
CONTENT
FEATURED NEWS FEEDS


NEWS (LAST 50)
Assassins Creed Unity DLC Pass In...
Battlefield Hardline - Hotwire Mu...
TGS 2014 Attendance Down Year-Ove...
TGS 2014 - Final Fantasy Agito Tr...
Top 5 Skyrim Mods of The Week - D...
Free PS4 Multiplayer This Weekend
Very Rare Vintage Complete Portab...
Blood Magic Goodness in our Exclu...
TGS 2014 - Final Fantasy Type-0 H...
Canon U.S.A.s Clean Earth Crew Be...
BioShock Infinite Complete Editio...
GS News - Super Awesome Final Fan...
10 Minutes of Bloodborne Gameplay...
Final Fantasy 15s Trailer Shows a...
TGS 2014 - Dragon Ball: Xenoverse...
Destiny Gameplay Sessions Are Thr...
Sleeping Dogs Dev Reveals Its Nex...
Free Ultra Street Fighter 4 Omega...
PlayStation TV Launching In Octob...
Call of Duty Lawsuit: Activision ...
Canon U.S.A. Distribution Center ...
Xbox Ones Sunset Overdrive: No Pl...
Bravely Second is More of The Bra...
Massive Battlefield 4 "Fall Patch...
Stapler-Swingline Long Reach - $3...
P.T.s Ghost Is a Nightmarish Weap...
Tokyo Game Show 2014 Photo Galler...
iPhone 6 Sales Reach a Record 10 ...
Hyrule Warriors Gets 4 DLC Packs,...
Canon U.S.A. Introduces Ten New F...
Watch Purist Arena FPS Toxikks Ga...
White PS4 Driveclub Bundle Announ...
Darksiders 2s $50 Million Budget ...
Metlox older bow bear cookie jar ...
Roundabout Review
Moon Landing Conspiracy Theory De...
As Kickstarter Failures Continue,...
6" Random Orbital $20
Bayonetta 2 Dev: Please Dont Post...
40" LCD HDTV for sale (1265 Olmst...
Antique Globe Distributing Novelt...
Rid Jid by J.R. Clark w/label Ant...
FISHER TUNER, 14 BAND EQ & 20...
Final Fantasy, Assassins Creed Co...
ISIS Used GTA 5 in a Recruitment ...
Strange and Unique Games at TGS 2...
1960s/1970s Mod Am-Fm 8-track & R...
Neverwinter Updated Review
Watch The Order: 1886s Victorian-...
Final Fantasy XV Demo Will Last Y...

REVIEWS & PREVIEWS (LAST 50)
Lichdom: Battlemage Review
Canon EOS 7D Mark II First Impres...
New Wave of Cars Confirmed for Xb...
Dreamcast Turns 15; Former Sega B...
Games Are "Far More Powerful" Tha...
What Makes Dragon Ball: Xenoverse...
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 hands-on
Canon PowerShot G7 X First Impres...
Alien: Isolations Survival Mode i...
Check Out This MLB Rookie Talking...
The Point - Destiny, Reviews and ...
Last-Gen Delay for Middle-earth: ...
NHL 15 Bluejackets Vs. Sabres Gam...
Alien: Isolation Goes Gold, New T...
Xbox Ones Sunset Overdrive Gets a...
Nikon D750 First-impressions revi...
Hatoful Boyfriend Review
Nikon D750 First Impressions Revi...
Forza Horizon 2 Gets Free DLC Car...
The Evi Within - TGS 2014 Gamepla...
Minimum Review
GS News Top 5 - GTA V PC Delay Ex...
Fujifilm X100T Overview
Borderlands Multiplayer Returns o...
Paperbound, Gauntlet, TRI and Kro...
Hyrule Warriors Review
Borderlands, Watch Dogs Discounte...
Rust Creator on Minecraft Sale: "...
On Launch Day, Activision Says De...
D4: Dark Dreams Dont Die Review
NHL 2K - One-Finger Control Mode
FIFA 15 - Ultimate Team Trailer
Final Fantasy XV Gameplay - TGS 2...
Sniper and Shotgun Gameplay - Hal...
Xbox One Exclusive Scalebound Is ...
EA Pledges to Fix "Gay Filter" in...
Reality Check - Best and Worst Ha...
Get Assassins Creed Unity PS4/Xbo...
Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 First I...
Listen to FIFA 15s Soundtrack
Fujifilm X30
Capturing Monsters With Monsters ...
Samsung NX1 First Impressions Rev...
$5 Metro 2033 and Eternal Sonata ...
Cannon Brawl Review
EA Removing Ray Rice from Madden ...
Watch Live: The Race to Finish De...
Legal Discussions Underway Over C...
Destiny Legendary and Glimmer Far...
Steam to Absorb Resident Evil 5 a...

Feed Provided By GameSpot Gaming Reviews

Okay look, let's try and enjoy this before Nintendo's legal team gets involved because, while it is a categorical breach of copyright, this project is just too wonderful to disregard completely.

A band of industrious (and currently anonymous) modders are trying to build a 2D version of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, reconfigured with a top-down view and a style so lovingly reminiscent of that beautiful SNES game, A Link to the Past.

If the task of rebuilding Shigeru Miyamoto's defining masterpiece wasn't daunting enough, the team has pledged to use "no already-existing engine and no utilities such as Game Maker."

So it is being built from scratch, piece-by-piece, which means it automatically qualifies as a vapourware candidate (sorry for shattering dreams). Equally perilous is the use of existing audio files from the N64 original, which I'm sure swings this into a the realm of plagiarism (again, sorry).

But just in case things soon turn sour, let's enjoy the fantasy of what this project could deliver: A besprited Ganondorf on Horseback, once feared, now slightly adorable in pixellated form. Quaintly crap lo-fi versions of the Ocarina songs as if they were custom ringtones. The lush forestry of The Lost Woods, pressed into a glorious 2D mush of greens and browns. You know you want it.

Also, the team are promising bonus content, such as unfreezing Zora's Domain. Take a closer look on the mod's website, and a view of the game in the videos above and below.

PS: If you fancy a more official (and reliably brilliant) version of Zelda, you could always try the 3DS version of Ocarina of Time.

Rob Crossley is GameSpot's UK News Editor - you can follow him on Twitter here
For all of GameSpot's news coverage, check out our hub. Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

[UPDATE] Following the publication of this story, Bungie's David "DeeJ" Dague responded to the leak, saying neither of the studio's (announced) in-development expansion packs for Destiny are finished.

"We noticed that you noticed that we already have plans for upcoming content packs in Destiny. We do! They have activity names (which may or may not change) and we have a really good idea what they're going to contain. They even have placeholder nodes in the Director, as you've already discovered.

But neither of the Expansion Packs we've announced are finished.

People at Bungie are hard at work to complete content for our first post launch pack, 'The Dark Below,' as I type these words. It will be finished soon. It releases in December. Soon, we'll detail it out for you so you can see exactly what we've been working on.

Thanks for playing. Thanks for the passion. We know you want details. We'll talk more soon."

The original story is below.

Several Destiny players have posted videos to YouTube documenting a bug that locked them out of the Tower, but revealed many pieces of content currently not in the game.

As you can see in the video, when the bug occurs the map shows several new, locked areas, some of which have already been announced as DLC. The events include new Story Missions, Strikes, and Raids, all of which take place on planets that are already included in the main game.

If you don't want to sift through the video, Reddit user KilledbyDice has compiled a list of everything the video reveals here.

Remember that this is a bug Bungie probably never intended players to see, so any and all content could easily change when it's officially announced.

Bungie recently outlined some of its plans for more updates to come over the next few months. It also revealed the first DLC pack for the game, The Dark Below, before the game launched earlier this month on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation 3, and Xbox 360.

Emanuel Maiberg is a freelance writer. You can follow him on Twitter @emanuelmaiberg.

For all of GameSpot's news coverage, check out our hub. Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

Nintendo has begun to roll out version 5.2.0 of its Wii U operating system, which implements a number of changes, tweaks, and additions.

Chief among the changes is the option to create folders on the console's home page, allowing users to better organise and arrange their software. Meanwhile, a download management icon will now feature on the home screen, giving users a more direct view of their download queue.

Nintendo has also tweaked its quick-start menu--a fairly recent addition to the operating system that allows users to jump into games and applications moments from booting the console, bypassing the Miiverse and homepage. With the latest update the quick-start menu can now be activated in more ways, and certain applications can be removed from it.

The design and layout of its home menu has also been refreshed with various background changes that should enhance system stability.

The changes come ahead of the release of Super Smash Bros for Wii U, which is the latest major Nintendo game to launch on the console. The game's release date has yet to be officially confirmed, but the latest retail leak suggests the game will ship on November 21.

Rob Crossley is GameSpot's UK News Editor - you can follow him on Twitter here
For all of GameSpot's news coverage, check out our hub. Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

Nintendo has showcased 47 new homepage themes for its 3DS handheld that fans can download individually for a small fee.

The downloadable themes give the 3DS a visual overhaul by adding new wallpapers and background images, as well as custom icons folders, music, and sound effects.

A gallery of the themes be found below, and features designs based on characters such as Mario, Link and Yoshi, as well as games such as Monster Hunter 4G and Animal Crossing. Also featured are more basic designs and wallpaper patterns.

Currently these operating system makeovers are only available in Japan, but Nintendo Europe recently mentioned an October release date for the west.

Prices start at 100 Yen, which equates to about $0.90 (£0.60), but do not sell for any more than 200 Yen.

Nintendo's new themes are available for both the 3DS and 3DS XL, and will also be compatible with the New Nintendo 3DS--the latest handheld version from Nintendo, featuring customisable back plates, as well as a second analogue stick, and NFC technology.

Though set to ship this year in Japan, the New Nintendo 3DS US release date is currently set for some time in 2015. It will also be region locked.

Rob Crossley is GameSpot's UK News Editor - you can follow him on Twitter here
For all of GameSpot's news coverage, check out our hub. Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

Hotline Miami 2 has new weapons, executions, and a new soundtrack to close out the brutally violent saga.

In some sense, the world already has a series that carries on the Gauntlet legacy; it's called Diablo, and clearly, it's done all right for itself over the years. That said, while Diablo is accessible, it's not the kind of game you'd have found swallowing up quarters for quick 10-minute sessions back when arcades were still profitable. As such, there's room in the current landscape for something far less ostentatious.

The Gauntlet reboot wants so very badly to be that game, and on some level, it is. The formula has changed little since the 1985 original. You have four classes: warrior, valkyrie, wizard, and elf, and after a short introduction to the controls and the personalities--there's some mild but enjoyable Terry-Pratchettesque banter between the heroes throughout--you walk through a door, down a hallway, and then jackhammer the attack button into oblivion for the next six hours, laying waste to skeletons, cave monsters, trolls, and sorcerers. When you're done clearing enough rooms of them, and you've collected enough keys, eaten enough meat, and stolen enough gold, you find the exit. You rejoice. You repeat.

2671848-2014092312011069.jpg

The first stages of nu-Gauntlet almost give the impression that the game requires just as little thought as its arcade forebears did. The good news--and the bad--is that this is not the case. Like the best of the best in this genre, Gauntlet does surprisingly solid work making each of the four characters play wholly differently from each other. The warrior is a straight top-down brawler; the valkyrie is a defensive, reactionary, strategic class; playing the elf is like playing a twin-stick shooter; and the wizard is an escapee from a real-time role-playing game, whose attacks involve two-button combinations that change spells from simple fireballs and beams of ice to full on cyclones summoned up to level the playing field. Put all four characters in the same level for some cooperative adventuring, and you've got a field of absolute chaos the likes of which you rarely see. Yes, you can still shoot the food. And yes, the game and your teammates are even snarkier and angrier when it happens.

And therein lays the problem. As much as Gauntlet wants to be the freewheeling alternative to other, more complex dungeon crawlers, it also seeks to deepen its decades-old gameplay, but does so in all the wrong ways. Ideally, a game like this would allow the player to slice and dice through enemies in one or two hits, but when all four classes are involved, even the most basic enemies, like the skeletons and mummies roaming the first stages, require putting some arduous work in. If friends are joining you, the challenge contributes to the sense of teamwork that naturally occurs when you have four different skill sets in play. If you're playing solo, you're guaranteed to play each level a few times over because an average grunt was able to demolish you in three hits, and you didn't kill enough enemies to earn a skull coin, the game's elusive version of a continue. All four characters have their own special versions of crowd-control skills--the warrior has a Zelda-ish spin attack, for instance, and the valkyrie throws her shield, Captain America-style--but the expected catharsis of taking out entire fields of your enemies in one fell swoop is nowhere to be found. Most of the time, you're stuck with standard attacks, and none are as precise or as free-flowing as you'd hope.

The ghosts of Gauntlet past.

Yes, you do have the ability to level up your characters. You can either buy new gear from the shopkeeper in the hub, or by use of a mastery system which rewards you for everything from killing a certain number of enemies with specials to getting yourself exploded. Pursuing mastery rewards gives Gauntlet a jolt of fun, but the rewards are slow coming, and should you perish during a stage, the game takes away the gold you've collected. And thus the stuff you could really use to get past that hard stage is out of reach until you clear the stage without it. Such cruel, cruel irony.

The end result is a game that seems stuck in an uncomfortable middle ground, harboring more intricacy and challenge than the Gauntlet pedigree implies, but too bare-bones of a package to stand tall next to the action role-playing games currently competing for your time. The new Gauntlet has charms, and teaming up to take down the endless hordes is one of its most gratifying ones, but in a game like this, you shouldn't have to fight so hard for your right to party.

Join the Winx as they prepare Alfea for its upcoming anniversary!
The Windows 8 home menu...which might see some big changes.

Windows 9 has not been officially announced, although we expect Microsoft to reveal the next version of their Windows operating system during a widely rumored press event scheduled for tomorrow, September 30. But in the meantime, the president of Microsoft Indonesia has reportedly spilled early details on an upgrade program for current Window 8 users. According to Indonesian site Detik (via PCWorld), Andreas Diantoro confirmed that "Windows 9 will be a free upgrade for all Windows 8 users."

His full quote, translated by the handy but not entirely perfect Google Translate was: "Easy, when the OS (Windows 9) was launched later, users who have been using Windows 8 just need to do the update via his device. It will be installed automatically." He reportedly made this comment at the Hotel Mulia in Jakarta.

A US Microsoft representative said that they have nothing to share at this time. But we'll keep you updated on the further details as they're made available, as well as what this could mean for PC gaming. On a related note, Microsoft's Head of Xbox, Phil Spencer, talked about renewing the company's focus on PC gaming earlier this year at E3.

Red Creek Valley, the picturesque setting of The Vanishing of Ethan Carter, feels like a postcard come to life. This isn't one of those pristine cards you'd buy off the rack at your local corner store, though. It's one with fraying corners that's been stuck to your refrigerator for the past 10 years, buried under layers of past-due bills and other reminders of life's harsh realities. Red Creek Valley is a place where decaying homes and lifeless railway lines sit beneath stunning mountain vistas and painterly sunsets, a forgotten corner of the American Rust Belt fighting a losing battle against nature. There's a beauty to it, certainly. But it's a melancholy and complex beauty.

(Warning: the following review tries to avoid spoilers, but you will find brief references to later plot points.)

Such themes are consistent throughout The Vanishing of Ethan Carter, an exceptional adventure game that introduces itself as a supernatural murder mystery before peeling the layers back to reveal something more touching and personal. You're Paul Prospero, a detective in search of a boy whose gift for peering into the unknown has triggered some terrifying mystery leading to the child's disappearance. "There are places that exist that very few people can see," remarks Prospero in the game's opening moments. "Ethan could have drawn a map."

Prospero's poetic ruminations combine with the game's breathtaking landscapes to create an atmosphere that's nothing short of mesmerizing. It's easy to surrender yourself to its gentle grip; I quickly found myself wandering through forested hills as wind swept through the autumn foliage and an evocative soundtrack guided me toward the next stunning view of the river valley below. But there's more to The Vanishing of Ethan Carter than simply taking in the scenery, something you learn early into the game when you stumble upon a mangled corpse next to a railroad track in the woods.

This is a game that deals in striking juxtapositions, building an uneasy contrast between its pastoral scenery and the grim aftermath of violent outbursts. As the detective on the case, it's your job to piece together clues at the scene of the crime to gain insight into what's happened. The blood on the front of a railcar and the victim's severed legs suggest he's been run over in some sort of accident, but why are there ropes on the track? Why is this blood-stained rock lying in a nearby patch of grass?

The adventure game mechanics are never very taxing, but studying the scene of a crime to determine the sequence of events is a clever touch.

As you inspect each clue, you see Prospero's thoughts swirling around onscreen, revealing little pieces of insight that help guide you in your search. Eventually, you have enough to reassemble the scene of the crime. But there's still work to be done. The game then gives you little glimpses into the events leading up to the murder, everything from a man grabbing a makeshift weapon to a strained conversation between two family members. You have to study these vignettes in order to determine the chronology of events. Once you get it, you're treated to an extra scene subtly pointing you in the next direction.

It's through these glimpses into the past that The Vanishing of Ethan Carter transforms from a simple collect-the-clues adventure game to a complex and captivating exercise in storytelling. On the surface, it's a tale that concerns itself with the Carter family's descent into madness. But by carefully delivering details and motivations for each character and playing around with the sequence of events, the game builds a gripping narrative that hints at a sinister and unquantifiable something lurking beneath the surface. It dips its toes into some disturbing waters, but the journey is a riveting one.

It's also much more than a simple murder mystery. What makes The Vanishing of Ethan Carter so special is the way it expertly toys with the player's assumptions to build upon its universal themes. Moments that initially seem like strange puzzles and supernatural events plucked directly from an H.P. Lovecraft novel wind up serving as touching snapshots into the mind of Ethan, a child who pours himself into fantastical literature as a way to escape a troubled relationship with his family. This is a narrative that tackles some heavy ideas, from youthful alienation to the way a person's limited circumstances can cause them to take their frustrations out on loved ones, but it spins those themes together in a fascinating and often poignant way.

Ethan Carter's environments are quite expansive, allowing it to pull double duty as a great first-person wandering simulator.

In that regard, The Vanishing of Ethan Carter is mysterious and unpredictable, while still deeply cohesive. There's a thematic bond that ties the whole thing together, from the run-down state of each building to the picturesque views that provide a vague sense of hope in the face of all this decay. It all culminates in a powerful ending that practically commands a second play through of the game in order to pick up on all the hints and foreshadowing you may have missed your first time through.

There are faults, but they're easy to forgive. On more than one occasion, I had to replay a few modest chunks of the game thanks to the way the obtuse auto save system fails to communicate exactly when your game has been saved. And while the game's lack of hand-holding allows you to explore and discover enriching environmental touches--such as Ethan's collection of novels tucked away in an attic--it can lead to a few issues. I often found myself wishing for some sort of logbook to reference previous conversations when I was stuck searching for some new details, leading me to make long treks across the game's rather expansive collection of forests and pathways in order to replay the most recent plot point.

But these issues are small hiccups in an otherwise phenomenal adventure. The Vanishing of Ethan Carter is a stirring tale that walks a fine line between the human and the supernatural. As the layers begin to peel back, what you'll find is a story told with a level of cleverness and elegance rarely seen in games. It confirms the feeling you had from the first breathtaking view; when you enter into Red Creek Valley, you're in for something special.

FIFA 15 is helping push sales to the Xbox One in the UK, we get another glimpse of Uncharted 4, and Konami announces PES 2015 new-gen resolutions.
Watch extended gameplay footage from 6180 the Moon featuring the Giant Bomb crew.
In episode 2, The Bangalore household gets bigger, but not necessarily for the better. Meet the new Bangalore kids in The Sims 4.
BioWare showed off some of the highly detailed character creation tools from their upcoming action role-playing game Dragon Age: Inquisition. We also get to see more of the game in action.

Multiple GameStop executives, including executive chairman Daniel DeMatteo, sold thousands of company shares this month for big-time payouts. Below is a breakdown of the stock action, per information from Securities & Exchange Commission documents filed on September 19.

Daniel DeMatteo (GameStop executive chairman) -- Sold 150,000 shares at $43.6306, netting himself $6,544,590. After the sale, he retains 230,953 shares.

Steven Koonin (GameStop director) -- Sold 1,800 shares at $43.6327, netting himself $78,538.86. After the sale, he retains 17,820 shares.

Robert Lloyd (GameStop CFO) -- Sold 20,000 shares at $43.6342, netting himself $872,684. After the sale, he retains 221,040 shares.

Michael Mauler (GameStop VP of International) -- Sold 24,070 shares at $43.6279, netting himself $1,050,123.55. After the sale he retains 167,503 shares.

GameStop shares are currently trading at $42.10. We have reached out to GameStop's investor relations representative, asking for context surrounding the recent stock sale.

It is not uncommon for top company executives to sell stock, as a handful of Electronic Arts employees did just that back in May when EA shares climbed to a six-year high.

Just last week, GameStop announced major hiring plans for this holiday season. The company plans to hire around 25,000 seasonal employees to help out over the next few months, which is flooded with high-profile new releases like Grand Theft Auto V for Xbox One and PlayStation 4, Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare, and Dragon Age: Inquisition, among a long list of others.

Eddie Makuch is a news editor at GameSpot, and you can follow him on Twitter @EddieMakuch

For all of GameSpot's news coverage, check out our hub. Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

Watch extended gameplay footage from Fenix Rage featuring the Giant Bomb crew.