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Sleeping Dogs Dev Reveals Its Nex...
White PS4 Driveclub Bundle Announ...
FISHER TUNER, 14 BAND EQ & 20...
TGS 2014 - Final Fantasy Agito Tr...
Final Fantasy, Assassins Creed Co...
Hyrule Warriors Gets 4 DLC Packs,...
Assassins Creed Unity DLC Pass In...
Roundabout Review
TGS 2014 - Dragon Ball: Xenoverse...
40" LCD HDTV for sale (1265 Olmst...
Strange and Unique Games at TGS 2...
Neverwinter Updated Review
Canon U.S.A. Distribution Center ...
Battlefield Hardline - Hotwire Mu...
Free PS4 Multiplayer This Weekend
1960s/1970s Mod Am-Fm 8-track & R...
Watch Purist Arena FPS Toxikks Ga...
Top 5 Skyrim Mods of The Week - D...
iPhone 6 Sales Reach a Record 10 ...
Massive Battlefield 4 "Fall Patch...
ISIS Used GTA 5 in a Recruitment ...
BioShock Infinite Complete Editio...
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As Kickstarter Failures Continue,...
Final Fantasy 15s Trailer Shows a...
P.T.s Ghost Is a Nightmarish Weap...
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Bravely Second is More of The Bra...
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Call of Duty Lawsuit: Activision ...
Watch The Order: 1886s Victorian-...
Moon Landing Conspiracy Theory De...
10 Minutes of Bloodborne Gameplay...
Canon U.S.A. Introduces Ten New F...
Rid Jid by J.R. Clark w/label Ant...
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Final Fantasy XV Demo Will Last Y...
6" Random Orbital $20
Blood Magic Goodness in our Exclu...
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Xbox Ones Sunset Overdrive: No Pl...

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Fujifilm X100T Overview
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Rust Creator on Minecraft Sale: "...
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Steam to Absorb Resident Evil 5 a...
Cannon Brawl Review
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Games Are "Far More Powerful" Tha...
Minimum Review
Nikon D750 First Impressions Revi...
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 hands-on
Hyrule Warriors Review
EA Pledges to Fix "Gay Filter" in...
What Makes Dragon Ball: Xenoverse...
Canon PowerShot G7 X First Impres...
Xbox Ones Sunset Overdrive Gets a...
Xbox One Exclusive Scalebound Is ...
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Final Fantasy XV Gameplay - TGS 2...
Reality Check - Best and Worst Ha...
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Listen to FIFA 15s Soundtrack
Canon EOS 7D Mark II First Impres...
The Point - Destiny, Reviews and ...
Alien: Isolations Survival Mode i...
D4: Dark Dreams Dont Die Review
The Evi Within - TGS 2014 Gamepla...
Get Assassins Creed Unity PS4/Xbo...
Destiny Legendary and Glimmer Far...
Paperbound, Gauntlet, TRI and Kro...
Sniper and Shotgun Gameplay - Hal...
FIFA 15 - Ultimate Team Trailer
EA Removing Ray Rice from Madden ...
Dreamcast Turns 15; Former Sega B...
Alien: Isolation Goes Gold, New T...
Hatoful Boyfriend Review
NHL 2K - One-Finger Control Mode
NHL 15 Bluejackets Vs. Sabres Gam...
Forza Horizon 2 Gets Free DLC Car...
Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 First I...
Borderlands, Watch Dogs Discounte...
Capturing Monsters With Monsters ...
On Launch Day, Activision Says De...
GS News Top 5 - GTA V PC Delay Ex...
Lichdom: Battlemage Review

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Sony will launch a Grand Theft Auto V PlayStation 4 bundle in Japan on December 11, according to the company's website.

The price listed for the bundle is 44,980 Yen, which is around $415.

Earlier this month, we saw a GTA V bundle appear on Amazon's Germany, Italy, and Spain websites, which all list a release of November 18 for €449.99 (about $573).

Developer Rockstar Games and Sony have yet to announce similar bundle for North America. We've contacted both companies for comment and will update this story with anything we hear back.

Grand Theft Auto V comes to Xbox One and PlayStation 4 on November 18. The PC version is scheduled to launch in January 2015. The open-world game has already shipped more than 34 million copies.

Rockstar Games also recently announced that it's releasing a 720p version of Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas for Xbox 360, with enhanced draw distance and Achievement support.

Emanuel Maiberg is a freelance writer. You can follow him on Twitter @emanuelmaiberg.

For all of GameSpot's news coverage, check out our hub. Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

Developer Slightly Mad Studios and publisher Bandai Namco have released a new Halloween trailer for Project Cars, which shows off the racing game's nighttime and severe weather conditions.

Project Cars trailers always look impressive, but this latest video, which is made up entirely of gameplay footage, is one of the best looking ones yet. With the appropriately spooky darkness, headlights, and rain-slick roads, you can really get a good idea of how impressive the lighting in the game is.

Slightly Mad Studios says that this exemplifies its approach to development, which is not to just put things in the game because they look pretty, but because they impact gameplay as well. Racing at night and under severe weather conditions, especially in a tight pack of cars, it says, will provide an extra challenge.

Project Cars is coming to PC, Xbox One and PlayStation 4. Slightly Mad Studios recently confirmed that it pushed the game's release date to March 20, 2015 in order to avoid the busy holiday season, when bigger, more established franchises will release their new games and potentially steal the spotlight.

Emanuel Maiberg is a freelance writer. You can follow him on Twitter @emanuelmaiberg.

For all of GameSpot's news coverage, check out our hub. Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

You can now play Payday 2 as John Wick, actor Keanu Reeves' character from his recently released movie of the same name.

“We continue working with great partners, this time with Lionsgate and their movie John Wick,” Starbreeze Chief Executive Officer Bo Andersson Klint said. “We’ve finally got a real hitman on our team. Being able to play as John Wick in Payday 2 ahead of the movie’s release is a great reward for our loyal Payday 2 community, which reached the final milestone of 1.5 million members in our Payday 2 Steam group before our 12-day Crimefest event.”

In addition to the new playable character, the free DLC includes a Hitman perk deck that gives you the ability to dual wield weapons, a new Chimano Compact pistol, dozens of modifications for said pistol, a new knife, and three new sunglasses, one just for Wick and two that all characters can use.

Finally, if you're planning on seeing John Wick anyway but don't already own Payday 2, consider purchasing your tickets through Fandango, which will come with a free copy of the game via Steam.

Emanuel Maiberg is a freelance writer. You can follow him on Twitter @emanuelmaiberg.

For all of GameSpot's news coverage, check out our hub. Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

If playing Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor got you in the mood for more The Lord of the Rings games, you still have one day left to get the perfect bundle.

Bundle Star's $10 The Lord of the Rings Bundle includes four PC games: LEGO The Hobbit, RPG Lord of the Rings: War in the North, multiplayer online battle arena (MOBA) Guardians of Middle-earth, and LEGO The Lord of the Rings.

It also comes with the complete DLC pack for Lego the Hobbit (includes all three pieces of DLC for the game) and Guardians of Middle-earth: Smaug's Treasure DLC, which includes special items and in-game currency. All games will require a Steam account.

As you can see by the countdown clock on Bundle Stars' website, the offer will end after tomorrow, so if you're interested in the bundle grab it before it's too late.

If you want to find out more about Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor, check out our review and previous coverage.

Emanuel Maiberg is a freelance writer. You can follow him on Twitter @emanuelmaiberg.

For all of GameSpot's news coverage, check out our hub. Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

Head of Xbox Phil Spencer said that Microsoft might have been able to sell more units of its white Xbox One if it bundled it with Halo: The Master Chief Collection, but that he wanted to use the white console to promote a new IP, Sunset Overdrive.

"Would we have sold more white consoles if we put it with the Master Chief Collection? I think that would have been the safer route, but I'd love to add another great AAA franchise to the list of exclusives on Xbox and I think Sunset can be one of those things and I want to get behind it in a big way," Spencer said on IGN's Podcast Unlocked.

But why not have a special edition Xbox One for both games? As Spencer explained, one reason is that Microsoft doesn't want too many different versions of the console on the market. He also said that unlike the Xbox One Assassin's Creed Unity and Black Flag bundle, special editions of the consoles in different colors or hard drive size have to be planned out a year in advance.

Spencer said that Microsoft is currently talking about special editions that will release next year. He didn't say if one of them will be bundled with Halo 5: Guardians, but that the game will be a "big event" for Microsoft that year.

"Releasing new IP and making it stand out is always a challenge, especially when you got Call of Duty coming with a massive game, you've got Assassin's Creed coming with another great game, you've got Halo there, and here we are with Sunset and in the end the number of bundles and custom consoles you do is not a huge percentage of the game sales, but I wanted to put a stake out there, our first time working with Ted [Price] and the team Insomniac, that this is really a first party game for us and we're really behind it."

All that being said, Microsoft did announce a Halo: The Master Chief Collection white Xbox One bundle, but only for Brazil and "additional select markets," which at the moment does not include the United States.

The Sunset Overdrive Xbox One bundle will sell for £349.99/€399.99. It launches October 28 alongside Sunset Overdrive.

Emanuel Maiberg is a freelance writer. You can follow him on Twitter @emanuelmaiberg.

For all of GameSpot's news coverage, check out our hub. Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

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You can play the realistic military simulator Arma 3 for free this weekend on Steam and also buy it for $30, a 50 percent discount.

The game is free to play now through Sunday at 1 p.m. Pacific Time, and the 50 percent discount offer will end on Monday 10 a.m. Pacific Time.

Players can also log into Arma's website with their Steam account during the free weekend to vote for their favorite Arma 3 mods and maps in the €500,000 Make Arma Not War contest, a collaboration between developer Bohemia Interactive and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC).

The winner of the Total Modification category (DayZ, for example, is an Arma total modification) will take home €200,000, while in the other categories the prize money is divided between first place (€50,000), second place (€30,000), and third place (€20,000) winners. You can vote in the contest until October 31, and the winners will be announced on March 5, 2015.

Steam has a few other great deals this weekend. You can get Saints Row IV for $6.79, Metro: Last Light Redux for $15, Dead Island Riptide for $5, and Risen 3: Titan Lords for $33.49.

Emanuel Maiberg is a freelance writer. You can follow him on Twitter @emanuelmaiberg.

For all of GameSpot's news coverage, check out our hub. Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

If you Google search a video game, Google's Knowledge Graph will now offer more details related to that game, like its release date, developer, publisher, and more.

If you search for Civilization: Beyond Earth, for example, you'll see a panel on the right with screenshots from the game, its Metacritic score, a short description via Wikipedia, the series it belongs to, and what platforms it's available for. The search works for both specific game titles and game series.

First introduced in 2012, Google's Knowledge Graph enhances searches by offering these summaries of movies, books, places, people, food, and more. Video games are just the latest addition.

“We always want to help people find the best answers to their questions – fast,” a Google spokesperson told VentureBeat. “With today’s update, you can ask questions about video games, and (while there will be ones we don’t cover) you’ll get answers for console and PC games as well as the most popular mobile apps.”

Emanuel Maiberg is a freelance writer. You can follow him on Twitter @emanuelmaiberg.

For all of GameSpot's news coverage, check out our hub. Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

It's fitting that the music first greeting you in Legend of Grimrock II is a rousing, bombastic tune that would just as easily be at home in a summer fantasy blockbuster. The sequel is a grand adventure, a far cry from the claustrophobic tunnels of its predecessor's excellent first-person, tile-based dungeon-crawling revival. And while the suffocating atmosphere of the franchise's first entry has been diluted by a focus on exploration rather than escape, its mechanics and well-crafted content have flourished and been improved in almost every way. Legend of Grimrock II is a logical and brilliantly executed next step for the series, exhibiting slight symptoms of too much freedom, but never stumbling for long.

Grimrock II has little to do with the mountain peak in the game's title; rather, it serves as reassurance that the formula defined decades ago, and modernized in the original Grimrock, still elegantly drives the experience. You fashion a party of adventurers with classic Dungeons & Dragons character trappings and step through unexplored three-dimensional terrain one tile at a time. Along the way, you acquire armor, weapons, and artifacts of increasing prowess, outfitting each of your characters to do real-time battle against a bestiary of monstrous creatures. You trigger fatally hidden traps, avoid the obvious ones, and search for vital clues to unlock gates and doorways, while solving riddles and puzzles in a quest for answers to larger mysteries and the almighty pursuit of power itself.

Giant rats are so 1990. It's all about pirate rats now.

Legend of Grimrock II shirks the longstanding reliance on subterranean labyrinths that have so-well suited the genre; instead, it pulls a new foursome of characters to the Isle of Nex, and the welcome addition of outdoor locales. From the temperate woodlands of Twigroot Forest to the noxious vapors of Keelbreach Bog, each environment carries a unique personality, and together they create a more diverse setting than the original's endless halls of stone and darkness. Of course, thousands of steps are still waiting to be taken in decrepit dungeons and tight tunnels, but the promise of returning to the fresh air of the surface alleviates the impenetrable gloom of underground life. Even returning to an open sky of a pitch black night--thanks to the great addition of a day and night cycle--feels like a safe haven from the skittering terrors that roam the chasms below."

The openness of the island setting is mirrored in the game's navigation. Shortly after your arrival on Nex, you're free to traverse nearly anywhere you can see, assuming you can unlock the barriers to entry and survive your own curiosity. To that point, there's a naural sense of progression in Grimrock II: it gently guides you through each new zone without spelling out an optimal order for visiting them. Should you somehow decipher the means to wander into territory too dangerous for your fledgling skills, that gentle hand becomes a clenched fist, ready to immediately bludgeon your party for its foolhardiness--but the option exists, and that non-linearity is refreshing.

Returning to an open sky in a pitch black night--thanks to the great addition of a day and night cycle--feels like a safe haven from the skittering terrors that roam the chasms below.

Unfortunately, that freedom of choice and ambiguous direction is where Grimrock II briefly falters. Much of the adventure hinges on the collection of scattered MacGuffins, conveniently spaced and designed to require the exploration of every area in order to chase them all down. In fact, the journey from your shipwrecked landing to the heart of the mystery is largely devoid of overarching narrative until the climax. What little references there are to a grander scheme are delivered in coy notes from an unknown master of this undiscovered island.

It's understandable that a focused narrative pushing you from one area to the next might hamper your ability to freely navigate the isle, but the chosen alternative is a nearly blind journey requiring a herculean effort and an enormous amount of good faith that it's going to pay off in the end--which it thankfully does. Instead, the real story takeaway is found in the immaculately designed riddles, puzzles, and moments of sometimes-not-so-near fatal choice that punctuate every step of the adventure.

Developer Almost Human has deftly crafted dozens of bite-sized, standalone engagements that are often vague, frequently complex, and always clever. And it's in these moments, when you're stuck wondering how exactly the provided clues don't point to the seemingly obvious conclusion, that you might truly appreciate the openness of a world that allows you to go off and perform some other task while you let all the elements of a particularly devious obstacle simmer in the back of your mind.

Word of advice: Don't fall in the pit full of zombies, aka, the Zombie Pit.

Overcoming the many vague riddles in Legend of Grimrock II is occasionally grueling, but to Almost Human's great credit, the answers are nearly always rooted in logic or interpretation, rather than finding some minute trigger on a wall. Oh, there are many secrets on Nex that are only uncovered with a keen eye, say, scrutinizing a sea of stone for the smallest switch, but these instances are almost exclusively tied to superfluous loot rather than vital game progression.

The vein of thoughtful improvement running through Legend of Grimrock II may be most apparent in its intricately designed quandaries, but it snakes through even the most basic elements of the franchise. Character creation, the cornerstone of the dungeon-crawling experience, exhibits a comparable leap forward. Where the original Grimrock opted for a trifecta of class selections--Fighter, Rogue, and Mage--the second offering builds on that trinity, filling the spaces between with new and unique roles. Choose to crush monsters through the Barbarian's brute force, strike a balance between marshal and mystical arts with a Battlemage, or brew life-saving concoctions with collected herbs as an Alchemist. All are viable additions to a budding party, though in practice, some classes are clearly more beneficial than others.

The real story takeaway is found in the immaculately designed riddles, puzzles, and moments of sometimes-not-so-near fatal choice that punctuate every step of the adventure.

In another sly wink poking fun at the tropes of the genre, there's even a Farmer class, which excels in absolutely nothing you'd want in an adventurer and gains experience not by killing enemies but by eating food. It's these small touches of playful meta--for example, some races gain hidden statistical benefits after ingesting their preferred foods, and the new Ratling race has a special affinity for cheese--that paint Grimrock II as a creation that's totally comfortable in its own skin while still true to the dungeon crawling mantle of yore.

But while an old-school spirit might power the core, the vessel is a more modern, expanded take on the experience than even the original Grimrock had to offer. The addition of weapon-specific special attacks adds a welcome layer of depth to combat; by drawing from your characters' energy pools, you're able to trigger devastating blows with titanic axes, or launch a flurry of slashes with a sabre. Moreover, the overhauled spell casting system allows you to quickly swipe across runes to prime a spell, replacing the cumbersome need to click each individual one. Now you can engage in combat that is fluid and interactive, rather than just repeatedly hacking at something until one of you squeals and collapses.

Better still, when paired with the active and passive bonuses of available skills and traits, each character can potentially attain enough unique purpose that fights are often elevated from slugfests to battles of timing, positioning, and resourcefulness. The appointed leader of my party, Arielle the Knight, started as the tough-as-nails tank, but somewhere during my 30-hour adventure she learned to dual-wield rune-adorned scimitars, backstabbing unsuspecting enemies in her impractically bulky armor. Thanks to the untethered skill system, she did it all, and you're free to similarly build any class in any direction you choose.

Poison, petrification, disease, blindness--there's a status effect for everyone!

Combat in Grimrock II is a more refined, empowering, and choice-centric part of the experience this time around, and with good reason: The beasts that inhabit the Isle of Nex are a much more formidable breed. Mainstay monsters that have adorned the darkened hallways of grid-based crawlers for years are well-represented: giant spiders, rats, ogres, and the undead. But new to the fray are creatures that, like your characters, carry their own functional skillsets. The giant toads roaming the bog may seem straightforward, but when one leaps across several tiles, landing behind your party, lashing out with its sticky tongue and pulling your characters' weapons out of their hands, the encounter shifts dramatically in its favor. Wispy elementals patrol the forests and press their attacks, unfazed by conventional weapons and spells, and leaving you helplessly searching for a vulnerability of some kind. And amethyst-hued cycloptic floating squid-beasts spew blinding ink from both ends, disgustingly enough, in the jewel-encrusted mines beneath the surface of Nex.

These functional additions to the bestiary are fairly indicative of what you should expect from Legend of Grimrock II: A well-established foundation revisited and excellently enhanced in the years between releases. Nearly every aspect of this dense adventure has been touched in a positive way, with none of the clutter that often accompanies second-act offerings that try to cram too much in. And despite the lack of narrative, Grimrock II is an outstanding second trip to the nostalgia well. It synthesizes the key elements that made the first game great, improves upon them in intriguing and powerful ways, and uses that as a platform for designing and launching more of the same great content.

Legend of Grimrock II is similar to one of its many well-designed riddles: While solving it may be a long, arduous process, approaching each obstacle with newfound understanding and hearing the victorious click of gears finally turning gives you a feeling of profound pride and accomplishment. Legend of Grimrock II is another glorious glimpse of the past, a window to a genre dead and buried and brought back to life with care and respect, and I urge you to peek through it.

There's an elite brand of horror that, even in these glory days when players are drowning in utterly terrifying interactive experiences, is rare to see, and harder to pull off, and that is the horror of the self. That is, the terror that comes not from a malignant, malicious invader that must be put down, but from witnessing perversions and desecrations beyond imagining, and realizing you're responsible for such terror, and you have to forever change to keep it at bay. This is the territory that Silent Hill 2 occupies, and it's one of only a few games to get it exactly right.

Neverending Nightmares is a solemn attempt to flourish in that territory, and it has the right ideas. It's the story of a young man named Thomas who is stuck in a seemingly eternal Inception-style loop of visceral Edward Gorey nightmares. His own house is slowly overtaken by living, ominous shadows and dolls with frozen smiles whose eyes follow him when he walks by. He finds himself in an asylum overrun by straight-jacketed cannibals and with haphazardly-piled mutilated dead in the hallways. Dead women rain from the sky in a cemetery while birds feed on the corpses. There are common elements in each scenario, but the omnipresent one is the ephemeral specter of a black-haired girl. The girl takes many forms: sister, wife, psychiatrist, daughter, china doll, bride, and, not least of all, bloody, knife-wielding murderwoman. She is both the reason to press on and the reason to want to escape every nightmare Thomas finds himself in. But you don't escape. You simply… persist.

Spot the creepy ghost lady, win a prize.

The devil is quite literally in the details in Neverending Nightmares. As you explore, a room might be little more than a bunch of family paintings, or a benign toy chest in a corner, or a sterile bathroom. Returning to that same room later, the wallpaper might have turned into deathly skulls, or the expression on the doll’s face turned to terror; random blood stains might’ve appeared, or you might hear random whispers, crying, and screams off in the distance. When Neverending Nightmares is at its best, it’s a sort of hellish Gone Home, where opening a new door means falling forever, having your Achilles tendons slashed, ripping out your own veins like string cheese; and making progress towards a new nightmare is indistinguishable from abject failure until you notice the change in the air, a different set of taunting voices. It's a perfect storm of fear: You are free to explore yet claustrophobically trapped, all at once.

This dichotomy would create a distressing combination even if movement weren’t so restricted. Thomas' regular gait when walking is a limping shuffle that makes simple walks down a hallway feel like roaming 40 years in a desert. Yes, you have the ability to run, but Thomas apparently has the stamina of a chain-smoker with one lung, and you can get maybe five seconds of sprinting out of him before he’s exhausted. It adds a nice layer of tension to the game's many terrifying chases, but when it takes forever to get from point A to B, tension turns into flat annoyance.

Worst. Slumber party. Ever.

The monotony isn't helped by the fact that Neverending Nightmares is such a sparse game. After knowing what's scattered around each environment, you can go for stretches where you’re walking in and out of doors with nothing happening, nothing having changed, and with nothing new to interact with. The intent seems to be to give the player breathing room before going in for the scare, but it feels more artificial. Bad dreams typically aren't characterized by moments of lukewarm emptiness, and the fact that there are many here distracts.

What dreams do have, however, is abstraction, and Neverending Nightmares excels here. The game speaks in the broken dream language of trauma and internalized pain like few games do, and the facts of Thomas continually murdering himself, being marauded by defective babies, or seeing the girl dead in so many configurations are meant to walk the careful line between subtext and text. You are meant to put the pieces together, and the more the game feeds you on the far extremes of violence and sadness, the less it makes sense. Are you watching a man who killed a loved one and can no longer rest? Are you watching a brother stuck in purgatory for attempting suicide? Are you seeing the aftereffects of a parent grieving a dead child? The emotions are clearly represented: Fear, grief, surrender, self-loathing, and doubt.

Protip: Anything she found here is terrifying. Please don't follow her.

What those emotions are in aid of is the pertinent question, and it's a haunting one, which the game's multiple endings do muddled work in answering, to both the game’s benefit and detriment. You walk away with heady questions about what you’ve played. What you might not come away with is satisfaction. Despite being only a one-to-two- hour game, it feels like a long way to get to either of the three finish lines; even trying for a second ending feels like work, and at least one of the endings puts far too easy a cap on what came before to feel true to the preceding hour.

And yet, having slept on it, I find myself obsessing over the questions raised, and the imagery foisted upon me by the encroaching darkness, than I have with any game in recent memory. Its frustrations are many, but they are not what sticks in the mind after it’s done. Neverending Nightmares might be a dream only worth taking once, but once is all it needs to work its ill upon you.

We get heaps of Super Smash Bros. Wii U news, a silly dev threatened to kill Gabe Newell, and the PC specs for Assassin’s Creed Unity are crazy high!
Check out a four player free-for-all featuring Kirby, Toon Link, Wii Fit Trainer, and Sheik from Super Smash Bros Wii U.
Check out some gameplay from the crazy 8 player mode from Super Smash Bros Wii U.
Cam scours the latest scientific research for positive news stories about playing video games, and comes back with three fascinating results for us.
The PlayStation TV performs a lot of tasks, although it doesn't necessarily perform them well.
Lucy and Rob take a look at the HD remaster of the remake of the original Resident Evil. It's slightly less complicated than it sounds.